What makes a girl different

On a Sunday morning like this, a girl is perched in her room,
drowning & mourning her murdered thoughts.
The community’s bell rings through every city louvres
but hers is painted with the image of a girl trying to creep back into
her mother’s womb
again.
A girl is a region of fireflies gauche in a wall painted with the
blood of her lover.
Of everything in here & now, her body is a feet of a long forgotten
war, a trail of blood and sand
This time, she’s not only trying to spell her dead Father’s name
but her lips are glued to find normal requiems for a dead heart.
How you see a girl then
happy to worship her lover
as a god,
how you see a girl then
scribbling love letter’s on her lover’s
Cheeks,
how you see a girl then
frolicking around her lover’s
shadow
like when they say “till death do us apart”
A girl now is a rainbow in a wilderness eating up the colour on
her mother’s skin.
A girl is different now when she has a coffin of her lover’s portrait
buried in between her body.

How you look yourself in the mirror

This time, the mirror calls your name and you jump forward
With your shadow forming out of you to see how well you’ve
Turned into.
It reads your thought & knows your secret before you appear
like a broken vessel.
First, it shows you the trace of your lover’s hand running through
your face
speaking the harsh languages
rocks understand when rivers course
through them
It shows the redness around your eye when you whimper into
a river.
It decodes the heart of a broken vessel when you stare all your
eyes into it.
It reminds you of an African lady posing every morning when you
Think yourself as a lost tool panel-beated into punching bags.

About the author

Emmanuel Ojeikhodion is a young Nigerian poet who uses poetry as a tool to set dreams free. He studies English and Literature at University of Benin, Southern Nigeria. When he is not writing, he is thinking of what to  write next and enjoys meeting new poets. His work appears on ; Praxis magazine online, Pangolin review, Peeking Cat  poetry magazine and forthcoming in Kalahari review and Deracine magazine. He is on Twitter as @hermynuel

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editor@ngigareview.com
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